Commodore CDTV
Released:March 1991
Price:US $999
CPU:Motorola 68000 @ 7MHz
RAM:512K or 1MB
Display:16 colors, up to 640 x 400
4096 colors in HAM mode
Ports:parallel, serial, floppy
RGB, MIDI, audio
Storage:CD-ROM (read only)
optional external floppy
OS:CDTV/AmigaDOS 1.3
Interface:Wireless controller

Famous Amiga graphic artist Jim Sachs
created the CDTV internal graphics and user

The Commodore CDTV (Commodore Dynamic Total Vision) is a computer in disguise - as an interactive multimedia and entertainment system, designed to complement the typical home entertainment system.

It was launched in March 1991 at the winter CES in Las Vegas, and was the first CD-ROM based consumer device on the market, although others followed shortly after.

With the ability to play standard audio music, CD+G (graphics), and proprietary CDXL format CD-ROM disks, the CDTV owner has plenty to choose from - music, games, entertaiment, even limited motion video.

Under the hood, the CDTV is based on the Amiga 500, a personal computer which Commodore released four years earlier in 1987. New additions include the internal proprietary CD-ROM drive, built-in MIDI support, and a wireless infrared controller.

The optional $200 expansion kit provides a keyboard, mouse, and external floppy drive, all in matching black, to turn the CDTV into a full-fledged Amiga computer, able to run most software applications designed for the Amiga 500 computer system. The optional black matching high-resolution computer monitor fills out the ensemble.

Related Links

  • CDTV Information Center
  • Amiga History Guide
  • Amiga Hardware Database
  • Multimedia players (1992)
  • The Definitive CDTV Retrospective: Part I from The Ninjaw's Amiga CD32 Page

  • History of the Amiga Computer

    • 1982: Hi-Toro Incorporated is formed by a group of midwest investors trying to cash in on the video game craze. The name was later changed to Amiga, Incorporated after being confused with the lawn-mower manufacturer, Toro.
    • 1983: Information is leaked about an incredible computer codenamed Lorraine featuring unheard of graphics and sound capabilities, multitasking, 80 column display, 5+ megs of RAM and MORE!
    • 1984: August - Commodore purchases Amiga Corporation.
    • 1985: July - Commodore unveils the new Amiga 1000 in New York, for US$1300.
    • 1986: Commodore releases Transformer software for the Amiga, which, along with the Commodore 1020 5 1/4-inch disk drive, provides limited MS-DOS compatibility.
    • 1987: January - Commodore announces the Amiga 500.
    • 1987: January - Commodore announces the Amiga 2000.
    • 1988: December - Commodore announces the A2286D Bridgeboard for the Amiga 2000. The A2286D contains an 8-MHz Intel 80286 and a 1.2MB 5 1/4-inch disk drive.
    • 1988: Commodore introduces the Amiga 2000HD.
    • 1988: Commodore introduces the Amiga 2500.
    • 1989: January - Commodore announces that 1 million Amiga computers have been sold.
    • 1989: November - Commodore announces the Amiga 2500/30. It is essentially an Amiga 2000 with a 2630 Accelerator Board (25-MHz 68030 and 68882 math coprocessor).
    • 1990: April - Commodore offers Amiga 1000 owners US$1000 to trade in their Amiga on a new Amiga 2000.
    • 1990: June - Commodore ships the Amiga A3000 computer. Prices start at US$4100 with a monitor.
    • 1990: September - NewTek ships the Video Toaster, a hardware/software real-time video effects tool for the Amiga 2000, for US$1600.
    • 1991: January - Commodore releases the CDTV package. It features a CD-ROM player integrated with a 7.16-MHz 68000-based Amiga 500. List price is US$1000.
    • 1991: Commodore unveils the Amiga 3000UX. Cost is US$5000, without a monitor.
    • 1992: March - Commodore introduces the Amiga 600 for a base price of $500.
    • 1992: September - Commodore introduces the Amiga 4000.
    • 1992: December - Commodore introduces the Amiga 1200.
    • 1994: Commodore International and Commodore Electronics (two of the many international components of Commodore Business Machines) file for voluntary liquidation.
    • 1995: April - At an auction in New York, ESCOM buys all rights, properties, and technologies of Commodore.
    • 1997: Gateway buys bankrupt Amiga.
      Source: Chronology of Events in the History of Microcomputers

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